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Advertisement | Short paragraph about the advertising | Essay for students

by Sandeep | Posted on Monday, April 10th, 2017

Advertisement  

“Advertisement is the ability to sense, interpret… to put the very heart throbs of a business into type, paper, and ink”. 

 

Meaning of Advertisement

The advertisement says that publicity of a particular product and different things and makes at the commercially. This new commercial India has developed the country by advertisement. It promoted by the special interest of a particular person, caused, or the sale of a product.

As we know, on the ancient time hawker was advertises their products by far. But at present, there is the great form of advertising is increased. In a market, the businessman has produced the new things of advertisement for sale their products. There is various type of advertising; they can advertise by the printing of goods, Internet, and television media, etc. This is significant for the market.

Proverb for advertisement

In the country, there is every day new things are producing. It results that people have so need for new invention. Devices are increasing in the country on every day. It says that everyone has the necessity for the invention.

As we know, that crucial word said, Necessity is a mother of invention . But nowadays it changed by the reverse, and it is true. In modern business, an invention is a mother of necessity.

Advertisement is the backbone of commerce and industry

Some people did not have any knowledge of any products in the market, but nowadays there are people has begun to feel and need for those goods which they had never heard. A demand of citizens increased the advertisement. It is the backbone of the commerce and industry.

Oral and written publicity

People were introducing their product in the market by the ancient form, which is called the oral promotion and written propaganda. Oral publicity means that people spread his product knowledge by the mouth publicity. And printed advertising means that people spread their product knowledge by the print of product for better explain their customer.

In a modern country, there are both combination of the oral and written publicity is widespread by the television.

Advantages of advertising

In advertising, there are many advantages. In the modern commercial country, advertising plays a significant role for the better connection between buyer and seller. The advertisement comes in the center of the purchaser and seller and introduces the product of vendor at the better way which includes the existence and utility of the products available in the market.

In modern times, there is commercial world becomes the massive complex with significant competition. They are getting the huge profit from the advertising after the spending of huge money. And it is the very profitable investment for the commercial.

Sources of the advertising

  • The Internet and online media

Nowadays Advertising is playing a significant role in the web and online media. Almost, every person is doing publicity for their products by the internet advertising. It is very profitable for the all. People are advertising his product on his website. Here, so many examples of the advertising source such as big sites, OLX.com, Quiker.com, etc.

  • Newspaper

A major part of the daily newspapers is full of advertisement. ‘Situations Vacant,’ ‘Tender Notice,’ ‘Educational,’ ‘Lost and Found,’ ‘Matrimonial,’ cinema ads and advertisements of so many other commodities are regular features of all newspapers. Radio and Television also are being used as means of commercial advertisement.

  • Cinema slides

In a cinema hall, first of all, we see the ad slides. It is also the better way of advertising.

  • Wall hoardings

We all know that big poster pasted on the walls for advance advertisement of particular products. Walls painted and big signboards displayed on crossings and prominent places to serve this purpose.

  • Periodicals

There also advertised by the magazines and handbills which distributed in public for the advance sale of goods.

  • Radio and television

Radio and television are the best advertisement medium for publicity of products.

Art of advertising

Advertising is not a natural art for everyone. It shows the certain quality of the good publicity. It should base on the human being psychology. There are various types of things in the market which divided by the different type of customers, and it depends upon the art of advertising.

A thing meant for ladies, should be advertised in such a way that they attracted towards it. If men are to be customers, then it should appeal to their tastes. Goods for different income groups should be advertised, taking into consideration their purchasing power.

A motor car is a thing for the rich. Its advertisement must be touching the mentality of the rich. Usha Sewing Machine should advertise in such a way that the family man, with ordinary income, may feel the economic advantages of the investment of his money on it.

It is vital for the better advertise; It should be attractive because people look towards and advertisement only if it is eye catching. People become interesting so much when they see the good and exciting pictures which may affect to them for his point of view.

Disadvantages of advertising

The advertisement is not allowing in the market for cheap and good articles. There are so many things that we don’t have any need because it creates artificial demand. It creates forceful for us to buy expensive stuff. It creates disharmony in the family when our young members want such advertised goods which we cannot afford. But the most harmful effect of advertisement is seen on the right field.

Conclusion

Advertising has some advantages and some disadvantages for the developing country. Here, all type of media is using for the increase the better advertisement. The primary advertising role is promotion and launch of the product in the market. Consequently, at this time advertising is a huge place of promoting everything.

 

 

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About the Author Sandeep

Hi Guys, I am Sandeep Co-founder of IASpaper and UPSCToday Staying in Mumbai (India) and pursuing graduation in Computer Science and Engineering from Mumbai University. I love helping Aspirants.
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Opinion Essay – Advertising

in Sonstige , geschrieben von unbekannt

Everyone, everywhere, anytime. A normal person, who lives in a huge city like Vienna, is y a „victim“ of advertising many times a day.  On the way to school, to work, while relaxing in front of the television;  isn’t that shocking? Advertising is the process of attracting the public, especially by paid announcements. It is the medium to make customers aware of a product or service. For example, you might invent and produce the greatest toy in the world but how would anyone know something about it unless you told him? A lot of unknown companies could only grow up so fast and successfully, because they used the internet or other medias to present (advertising) their product in the whole world. „Sex sells“ is one of the most famous quotations related to this topic.

 
But, is this really true? Do we really need so much advertising with half naked models in front of it? Wouldn’t it more convincing, if the ad would inform the consumers about the product than praise it with any kind of sex. I don’t even think the Internet would exist the way it does nowadays,  if there were not so much advertising. The World Wide Web represents the largest and cheapest way to reach a huge crowd of people.  
 
I completely agree with the quotation, that our environment is overfilled with advertisement posters and jingles. But the thing that annoys me more than the quantity of advertising is the way they do it. I really hate the most of these stupid television commercials.  In some cases I would not refrain from buying a product because of its quality or price, but rather because of the way it was advertised.
 
 
In spite of the fact that advertising can be very annoying – for example interrupting an exciting movie or popping-up over the website – I would say, that advertising is very important for our life and society because it „can“ transmit important informations about new products or services. And I can imagine that in the future there will be more ads, because the technology to present products will be more advanced. But my opinion is, that the consumers should be able to regulate the advertising given to them.  For example, by blocking the ads in the internet or disabling the interruption in movies.

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Modern Love

You May Want to Marry My Husband

Image
CreditCreditBrian Rea

By Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Leer en español 阅读简体中文版

Note: Amy Krouse Rosenthal died on March 13, 2017, 10 days after this essay was published. You can read her obituary here . In June, 2018, her husband published this response .

I have been trying to write this for a while, but the morphine and lack of juicy cheeseburgers (what has it been now, five weeks without real food?) have drained my energy and interfered with whatever prose prowess remains. Additionally, the intermittent micronaps that keep whisking me away midsentence are clearly not propelling my work forward as quickly as I would like. But they are, admittedly, a bit of trippy fun.

Still, I have to stick with it, because I’m facing a deadline, in this case, a pressing one. I need to say this (and say it right) while I have a) your attention, and b) a pulse.

I have been married to the most extraordinary man for 26 years. I was planning on at least another 26 together.

Want to hear a sick joke? A husband and wife walk into the emergency room in the late evening on Sept. 5, 2015. A few hours and tests later, the doctor clarifies that the unusual pain the wife is feeling on her right side isn’t the no-biggie appendicitis they suspected but rather ovarian cancer.

As the couple head home in the early morning of Sept. 6, somehow through the foggy shock of it all, they make the connection that today, the day they learned what had been festering, is also the day they would have officially kicked off their empty-nestering. The youngest of their three children had just left for college.

So many plans instantly went poof.

No trip with my husband and parents to South Africa. No reason, now, to apply for the Harvard Loeb Fellowship. No dream tour of Asia with my mother. No writers’ residencies at those wonderful schools in India, Vancouver, Jakarta.

No wonder the word cancer and cancel look so similar.

This is when we entered what I came to think of as Plan “Be,” existing only in the present. As for the future, allow me to introduce you to the gentleman of this article, Jason Brian Rosenthal.

He is an easy man to fall in love with. I did it in one day.

Let me explain: My father’s best friend since summer camp, “Uncle” John, had known Jason and me separately our whole lives, but Jason and I had never met. I went to college out east and took my first job in California. When I moved back home to Chicago, John — who thought Jason and I were perfect for each other — set us up on a blind date.

It was 1989. We were only 24. I had precisely zero expectations about this going anywhere. But when he knocked on the door of my little frame house, I thought, “Uh-oh, there is something highly likable about this person.”

By the end of dinner, I knew I wanted to marry him.

Jason? He knew a year later.

I have never been on Tinder, Bumble or eHarmony, but I’m going to create a general profile for Jason right here, based on my experience of coexisting in the same house with him for, like, 9,490 days.

First, the basics: He is 5-foot-10, 160 pounds, with salt-and-pepper hair and hazel eyes.

The following list of attributes is in no particular order because everything feels important to me in some way.

He is a sharp dresser. Our young adult sons, Justin and Miles, often borrow his clothes. Those who know him — or just happen to glance down at the gap between his dress slacks and dress shoes — know that he has a flair for fabulous socks. He is fit and enjoys keeping in shape.

If our home could speak, it would add that Jason is uncannily handy. On the subject of food — man, can he cook. After a long day, there is no sweeter joy than seeing him walk in the door, plop a grocery bag down on the counter, and woo me with olives and some yummy cheese he has procured before he gets to work on the evening’s meal.

Jason loves listening to live music; it’s our favorite thing to do together. I should also add that our 19-year-old daughter, Paris, would rather go to a concert with him than anyone else.

A Conversation Between Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Her Daughter

Ms. Rosenthal talks with her daughter Paris in July 2016, after learning her cancer had returned. Ms. Rosenthal passed away on March 13, 2017. This conversation was recorded for StoryCorps, an independently funded non-profit organization, in July 2016 in Chicago.

When I was working on my first memoir, I kept circling sections my editor wanted me to expand upon. She would say, “I’d like to see more of this character.”

Of course, I would agree — he was indeed a captivating character. But it was funny because she could have just said: “Jason. Let’s add more about Jason.”

He is an absolutely wonderful father. Ask anyone. See that guy on the corner? Go ahead and ask him; he’ll tell you. Jason is compassionate — and he can flip a pancake.

Jason paints. I love his artwork. I would call him an artist except for the law degree that keeps him at his downtown office most days from 9 to 5. Or at least it did before I got sick.

If you’re looking for a dreamy, let’s-go-for-it travel companion, Jason is your man. He also has an affinity for tiny things: taster spoons, little jars, a mini-sculpture of a couple sitting on a bench, which he presented to me as a reminder of how our family began.

Here is the kind of man Jason is: He showed up at our first pregnancy ultrasound with flowers. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana.

This is a man who emerges from the minimart or gas station and says, “Give me your palm.” And, voilà, a colorful gumball appears. (He knows I love all the flavors but white.)

My guess is you know enough about him now. So let’s swipe right.

Wait. Did I mention that he is incredibly handsome? I’m going to miss looking at that face of his.

If he sounds like a prince and our relationship seems like a fairy tale, it’s not too far off, except for all of the regular stuff that comes from two and a half decades of playing house together. And the part about me getting cancer. Blech.

In my most recent memoir (written entirely before my diagnosis), I invited readers to send in suggestions for matching tattoos, the idea being that author and reader would be bonded by ink.

I was totally serious about this and encouraged submitters to be serious as well. Hundreds poured in. A few weeks after publication in August, I heard from a 62-year-old librarian in Milwaukee named Paulette.

She suggested the word “more.” This was based on an essay in the book where I mention that “more” was my first spoken word (true). And now it may very well be my last (time shall tell).

In September, Paulette drove down to meet me at a Chicago tattoo parlor. She got hers (her very first) on her left wrist. I got mine on the underside of my left forearm, in my daughter’s handwriting. This was my second tattoo; the first is a small, lowercase “j” that has been on my ankle for 25 years. You can probably guess what it stands for. Jason has one too, but with more letters: “AKR.”

I want more time with Jason. I want more time with my children. I want more time sipping martinis at the Green Mill Jazz Club on Thursday nights. But that is not going to happen. I probably have only a few days left being a person on this planet. So why I am doing this?

I am wrapping this up on Valentine’s Day, and the most genuine, non-vase-oriented gift I can hope for is that the right person reads this, finds Jason, and another love story begins.

I’ll leave this intentional empty space below as a way of giving you two the fresh start you deserve.

Image

With all my love, Amy

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the author of 28 children’s picture books and the recent memoir “Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal.” She lives in Chicago.

To hear Modern Love: The Podcast, subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music . To read past Modern Love columns, click here . To contact Modern Love, email [email protected]

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page ST 6 of the New York edition with the headline: You May Want to Marry My Husband. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Related Coverage

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Children’s Author and Filmmaker, Dies at 51

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‘Live for the Moment’: Readers Share Stories of Love and Loss

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When a Couch Is More Than a Couch

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Supported by

Modern Love

You May Want to Marry My Husband

Image
CreditCreditBrian Rea

By Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Leer en español 阅读简体中文版

Note: Amy Krouse Rosenthal died on March 13, 2017, 10 days after this essay was published. You can read her obituary here . In June, 2018, her husband published this response .

I have been trying to write this for a while, but the morphine and lack of juicy cheeseburgers (what has it been now, five weeks without real food?) have drained my energy and interfered with whatever prose prowess remains. Additionally, the intermittent micronaps that keep whisking me away midsentence are clearly not propelling my work forward as quickly as I would like. But they are, admittedly, a bit of trippy fun.

Still, I have to stick with it, because I’m facing a deadline, in this case, a pressing one. I need to say this (and say it right) while I have a) your attention, and b) a pulse.

I have been married to the most extraordinary man for 26 years. I was planning on at least another 26 together.

Want to hear a sick joke? A husband and wife walk into the emergency room in the late evening on Sept. 5, 2015. A few hours and tests later, the doctor clarifies that the unusual pain the wife is feeling on her right side isn’t the no-biggie appendicitis they suspected but rather ovarian cancer.

As the couple head home in the early morning of Sept. 6, somehow through the foggy shock of it all, they make the connection that today, the day they learned what had been festering, is also the day they would have officially kicked off their empty-nestering. The youngest of their three children had just left for college.

So many plans instantly went poof.

No trip with my husband and parents to South Africa. No reason, now, to apply for the Harvard Loeb Fellowship. No dream tour of Asia with my mother. No writers’ residencies at those wonderful schools in India, Vancouver, Jakarta.

No wonder the word cancer and cancel look so similar.

This is when we entered what I came to think of as Plan “Be,” existing only in the present. As for the future, allow me to introduce you to the gentleman of this article, Jason Brian Rosenthal.

He is an easy man to fall in love with. I did it in one day.

Let me explain: My father’s best friend since summer camp, “Uncle” John, had known Jason and me separately our whole lives, but Jason and I had never met. I went to college out east and took my first job in California. When I moved back home to Chicago, John — who thought Jason and I were perfect for each other — set us up on a blind date.

It was 1989. We were only 24. I had precisely zero expectations about this going anywhere. But when he knocked on the door of my little frame house, I thought, “Uh-oh, there is something highly likable about this person.”

By the end of dinner, I knew I wanted to marry him.

Jason? He knew a year later.

I have never been on Tinder, Bumble or eHarmony, but I’m going to create a general profile for Jason right here, based on my experience of coexisting in the same house with him for, like, 9,490 days.

First, the basics: He is 5-foot-10, 160 pounds, with salt-and-pepper hair and hazel eyes.

The following list of attributes is in no particular order because everything feels important to me in some way.

He is a sharp dresser. Our young adult sons, Justin and Miles, often borrow his clothes. Those who know him — or just happen to glance down at the gap between his dress slacks and dress shoes — know that he has a flair for fabulous socks. He is fit and enjoys keeping in shape.

If our home could speak, it would add that Jason is uncannily handy. On the subject of food — man, can he cook. After a long day, there is no sweeter joy than seeing him walk in the door, plop a grocery bag down on the counter, and woo me with olives and some yummy cheese he has procured before he gets to work on the evening’s meal.

Jason loves listening to live music; it’s our favorite thing to do together. I should also add that our 19-year-old daughter, Paris, would rather go to a concert with him than anyone else.

A Conversation Between Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Her Daughter

Ms. Rosenthal talks with her daughter Paris in July 2016, after learning her cancer had returned. Ms. Rosenthal passed away on March 13, 2017. This conversation was recorded for StoryCorps, an independently funded non-profit organization, in July 2016 in Chicago.

When I was working on my first memoir, I kept circling sections my editor wanted me to expand upon. She would say, “I’d like to see more of this character.”

Of course, I would agree — he was indeed a captivating character. But it was funny because she could have just said: “Jason. Let’s add more about Jason.”

He is an absolutely wonderful father. Ask anyone. See that guy on the corner? Go ahead and ask him; he’ll tell you. Jason is compassionate — and he can flip a pancake.

Jason paints. I love his artwork. I would call him an artist except for the law degree that keeps him at his downtown office most days from 9 to 5. Or at least it did before I got sick.

If you’re looking for a dreamy, let’s-go-for-it travel companion, Jason is your man. He also has an affinity for tiny things: taster spoons, little jars, a mini-sculpture of a couple sitting on a bench, which he presented to me as a reminder of how our family began.

Here is the kind of man Jason is: He showed up at our first pregnancy ultrasound with flowers. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana.

This is a man who emerges from the minimart or gas station and says, “Give me your palm.” And, voilà, a colorful gumball appears. (He knows I love all the flavors but white.)

My guess is you know enough about him now. So let’s swipe right.

Wait. Did I mention that he is incredibly handsome? I’m going to miss looking at that face of his.

If he sounds like a prince and our relationship seems like a fairy tale, it’s not too far off, except for all of the regular stuff that comes from two and a half decades of playing house together. And the part about me getting cancer. Blech.

In my most recent memoir (written entirely before my diagnosis), I invited readers to send in suggestions for matching tattoos, the idea being that author and reader would be bonded by ink.

I was totally serious about this and encouraged submitters to be serious as well. Hundreds poured in. A few weeks after publication in August, I heard from a 62-year-old librarian in Milwaukee named Paulette.

She suggested the word “more.” This was based on an essay in the book where I mention that “more” was my first spoken word (true). And now it may very well be my last (time shall tell).

In September, Paulette drove down to meet me at a Chicago tattoo parlor. She got hers (her very first) on her left wrist. I got mine on the underside of my left forearm, in my daughter’s handwriting. This was my second tattoo; the first is a small, lowercase “j” that has been on my ankle for 25 years. You can probably guess what it stands for. Jason has one too, but with more letters: “AKR.”

I want more time with Jason. I want more time with my children. I want more time sipping martinis at the Green Mill Jazz Club on Thursday nights. But that is not going to happen. I probably have only a few days left being a person on this planet. So why I am doing this?

I am wrapping this up on Valentine’s Day, and the most genuine, non-vase-oriented gift I can hope for is that the right person reads this, finds Jason, and another love story begins.

I’ll leave this intentional empty space below as a way of giving you two the fresh start you deserve.

Image

With all my love, Amy

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the author of 28 children’s picture books and the recent memoir “Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal.” She lives in Chicago.

To hear Modern Love: The Podcast, subscribe on iTunes or Google Play Music . To read past Modern Love columns, click here . To contact Modern Love, email [email protected]

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page ST 6 of the New York edition with the headline: You May Want to Marry My Husband. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Related Coverage

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Children’s Author and Filmmaker, Dies at 51

Image

‘Live for the Moment’: Readers Share Stories of Love and Loss

Image

When a Couch Is More Than a Couch

Image

COMMITTED

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