les 10 provinces et 3 territoires du canada

les 10 provinces et 3 territoires du canada

Provinces of Canada

Buy data      Donate

Updates: 

Update 12 to Geopolitical Entities and Codes (formerly FIPS 10-4) is dated 2013-06-30. It corrects the
French name of Newfoundland and Labrador by inserting a missing hyphen.

The name of Newfoundland changed to “Newfoundland and Labrador” (“Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador” in French) on
2001-12-06. This is reflected in Change Notice 8 to FIPS PUB 10-4, dated 2002-06-28, and in ISO 3166-2
Newsletter I-2 (2002-05-21). Subsequently the province’s postal designator was changed from NF to NL. ISO
3166-2 Newsletter number I-4, dated 2002-12-10, made the corresponding change to the ISO code. The name
“Yukon Territory” was changed to “Yukon” in the ISO standard on 2014-10-29.

Nunavut split from Northwest Territories on 1999-04-01. This is reflected in Change Notice 3 to FIPS PUB
10-4, dated 1999-05-17, which added Nunavut, and assigned new codes to it and to Northwest Territories.
Update I-1 to ISO 3166-2 (2000-06-21) added Nunavut, with NU as its code.

Country overview: 

Short nameCANADA
ISO codeCA
FIPS codeCA
LanguagesEnglish (en), French (fr)
Time zone Zones
CapitalOttawa, Ontario

 

Canada became a self-governing dominion in 1867. In 1926, an Imperial Conference clarified that the
dominions were autonomous communities within the British Empire, equal in status to Great Britain. The
formal name “Dominion of Canada” was phased out from the 1950s to 1982, in favor of simply “Canada”. The
British Commonwealth of Nations was formally inaugurated on 1931-12-11, with Canada and Newfoundland as
members. The Parliament of the United Kingdom retained the power to approve or reject some amendments to
the Canadian Constitution until 1982.

Canada began with four provinces in 1867. There have been territorial acquisitions since then, but
only one during the 20th century: Newfoundland, in 1949.

Other names of country: 

  1. Danish: Canada
  2. Dutch: Canada
  3. Finnish: Kanada
  4. French: Canada m
  5. German: Kanada n
  6. Icelandic: Kanada
  7. Italian: Canada m
  8. Norwegian: Canada
  9. Portuguese: Canad� m
  10. Russian: Канада
  11. Spanish: Canad� m
  12. Swedish: Canada, Kanada
  13. Turkish: Kanada

Origin of name: 

native word kanata: settlements; named by Jacques Cartier in 1536

Primary subdivisions: 

Canada is divided into ten provinces and three territories (French: territoires).

DivisionHASCISOFIPSSGCMARCTypePostConv-EConv-FZonePopulationArea(km.�)Area(mi.�)Capital
AlbertaCA.ABABCA0148abcpTAlta.Alb.-7:00~3,645,257661,848255,541Edmonton
British ColumbiaCA.BCBCCA0259bccpVB.C.C.-B.-8:00~4,400,057944,735364,764Victoria
ManitobaCA.MBMBCA0346mbcpRMan.Man.-6:00~1,208,268647,797250,116Winnipeg
New BrunswickCA.NBNBCA0413nkcpEN.B.N.-B.-4:00~751,17172,90828,150Fredericton
Newfoundland and LabradorCA.NFNLCA0510nfcpANfld.T.-N.-3:30~514,536405,212156,453Saint John’s
Northwest TerritoriesCA.NTNTCA1361ntctXN.W.T.T.N.-O.-7:00~41,4621,346,106519,734Yellowknife
Nova ScotiaCA.NSNSCA0712nscpBN.S.N.-�.-4:00~921,72755,28421,345Halifax
NunavutCA.NUNUCA1462nuctX  -5:00~31,9062,093,190808,185Iqaluit
OntarioCA.ONONCA0835oncpKLMNPOnt.Ont.-5:00~12,851,8211,076,395415,598Toronto
Prince Edward IslandCA.PEPECA0911picpCP.E.I.�-P.-�.-4:00~140,2045,6602,185Charlottetown
QuebecCA.QCQCCA1024qucpGHJQue.Qu�.-5:00~7,903,0011,542,056595,391Quebec
SaskatchewanCA.SKSKCA1147sncpSSask.Sask.-6:001,033,381651,036251,366Regina
YukonCA.YTYTCA1260ykctYY.T.Yn.-8:00~33,897482,443186,272Whitehorse
13 divisions33,476,6889,984,6703,855,103
  • HASC: Hierarchical administrative subdivision codes .
  • ISO: codes from ISO 3166-2. These are the same as “postal designators” – abbreviations used by Canadian Post.
  • FIPS: codes from FIPS PUB 10-4, a U.S. government standard.
  • SGC: province and territory codes from Statistics Canada’s Standard Geographical Classification.
    Groups of provinces with the same first
    digit can be referred to as a region. Region names are Atlantic (1),
    Prairies (4), and Territories (6).
  • MARC: Machine Readable Cataloging codes
  • Type: p = province; t = territory.
  • Post: Canadian postal codes have the format “ana nan“, where each a
    is a letter and each n is a digit. The first letter in a postal code
    can be used to locate the
    province. Some provinces can use any one of several letters. This column shows the letters that identify each
    province.
  • Conv-E: Conventional abbreviations used by Anglophone Canadians before standardization.
    Sometimes Newf. for Newfoundland, P.Q. for
    Quebec (Province of Quebec).
  • Conv-F: Conventional abbreviations used by Francophone Canadians before standardization.
  • Zone: Main time zone for province. Convert from UTC to local time by adding this number
    of hours. Tilde (~) indicates areas where
    daylight saving time is in effect during summer.
  • Population: 2011-05-10 census.
  • Area: Source [2].

Further subdivisions:

See the Counties of Canada page.

The subdivisions of the Canadian provinces and territories are varied in size, status, and stability. The eastern
provinces tend to be divided into counties; the western provinces, sections, divisions, or districts; and Yukon
is only subdivided for electoral or census purposes. Prince Edward Island appears to have been subdivided
into Prince, Queens, and Kings Counties for as long as it has been a province. Northwest Territory had been
subdivided into the districts of Franklin, Keewatin, and Mackenzie since 1912, although their borders had been
somewhat modified; then, about 1980, it was changed to five districts (Baffin, Fort Smith, Inuvik, Keewatin, and
Kitikmeot).

Other provinces are more complex. The units of local government include cantons, cities, community councils,
counties, districts, divisions, muncipalities, parishes, sections, towns, and villages. There are sub-varieties,
including county regional municipalities, district municipalities, metropolitan municipalities, and municipal
townships. Many provinces have more than one level of subdivision. Most of them have changed their subdivisions
several times. (See source [10].)

Territorial extent: 

  1. British Columbia is separated from Alaska by an indefinite boundary in coastal waters. It contains the Queen
    Charlotte Islands and Dundas Island, but not Dall Island, Prince of Wales Island, or Sitklan Island. The boundary
    with Washington follows the Strait of Juan de Fuca between Vancouver Island and the Olympic Peninsula, then turns
    north between Canada’s Sidney Island, South Pender Island, and Saturna Island, and the United States’s San Juan
    Island, Stuart Island, and Waldron Island, until it meets the longitude of 49� N.
  2. New Brunswick is divided from Maine by a line that runs down the Saint Croix River and passes between Deer Island,
    Campobello Island, Grand Manan Island, and adjacent islets on the Canadian side, across from West Quoddy Head, the
    easternmost point in the United States.
  3. Newfoundland and Labrador consists of the large island of Newfoundland, a large mainland area on the northeast
    coast (Labrador), and adjacent islands. Labrador has sometimes been abbreviated LB as if it were a province name.
  4. Northwest Territories includes the Canadian Arctic islands north of 70� N. and between 110� and 136� W. (to a
    first approximation; for a more accurate description of the boundary with Nunavut, see for example
    this page  ). The largest
    Arctic islands totally within Northwest Territories are Banks Island and Prince Patrick Island. Northwest Territories
    also includes large parts of Victoria Island and Melville Island.
  5. Nova Scotia includes Sable Island in the Atlantic Ocean.
  6. Nunavut includes all Canadian islands in Hudson Bay, James Bay, the Hudson Strait, Ungava Bay, and the Arctic
    Ocean between the eastern border of Northwest Territories and the northern tip of Labrador (see source [3]). The
    border between Labrador and Nunavut runs along Killiniq Island. The division between Nunavut and Greenland follows
    the Robeson Channel, Kennedy Channel, Kane Basin, Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, and Labrador Bay.
  7. Ontario includes Main Duck Island in Lake Ontario, and Pelee Island in Lake Erie. Middle Island, an islet lying
    off Pelee Island, is the southernmost point of land in Canada. Ontario also includes Manitoulin Island, between Lake
    Huron and Georgian Bay, the largest lake island in the world. In Lake Superior, Caribou Island belongs to Ontario.
  8. Quebec includes Anticosti Island and the �les de la Madeleine (Magdalen Islands) in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.
  9. Yukon includes Herschel Island in the Arctic Ocean.
  10. Four provinces or territories meet at approximately 60� N., 102� W.: Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Nunavut,
    and Saskatchewan.

The UN LOCODE page   for Canada lists locations in the country, some of them with their latitudes and longitudes, some with their ISO 3166-2 codes for their subdivisions. This information can be put together to approximate the territorial extent of subdivisions.

Origins of names: 

  1. Alberta: Named for Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, wife of the then-Governor General of Canada and daughter of
    Queen Victoria of England.
  2. British Columbia: British possession, on the Columbia River, named by Capt. Robert Gray for his vessel Columbia,
    in turn named for Cristopher Columbus.
  3. Labrador: Portuguese lavrador: laborer, farmer. Probably for Jo�o Fernandes, an explorer and farmer.
  4. Manitoba: Probably from Cree maniotwapow: the strait of the spirit, from a belief that a natural noise
    caused by pebbles on Manitoba Island was the sound of a spirit beating a drum.
  5. New Brunswick: Named in honor of King George III of England, a descendant of the House of Brunswick (Germany).
  6. Newfoundland: Called a “new found isle” by discoverer, John Cabot.
  7. Northwest Territories: Descriptive.
  8. Nova Scotia: Latin for New Scotland.
  9. Nunavut: Inuktitut for our land.
  10. Ontario: Named for Lake Ontario. From native word, possibly onittariio: beautiful lake.
  11. Prince Edward Island: Named for Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria of England.
  12. Quebec: From the Algonquian word for narrow passage, referring to the Saint Lawrence River at Cape Diamond.
  13. Saskatchewan: Named for the Saskatchewan River. From Cree Kisiskatchewani Sipi: swift-flowing river.
  14. Yukon: Named for the Yukon River. From native name Yu-kun-ah: great river.

Change history: 

  1. Around 1754, the lands which now form Canada were divided between France and Great Britain. Nouvelle-France (New
    France) was the name for all French territory in North America. Newfoundland and Nova Scotia were British colonies.
    The Hudson’s Bay Company held a charter from King Charles II of England, under which it governed Rupert’s Land.
  2. 1763-02-10: New France ceded to Great Britain by the Treaty of Paris. France retained only the islands of Saint
    Pierre and Miquelon, which now constitute a territorial collectivity of France.
  3. 1763-10-07: Island of Saint John’s (French �le Saint-Jean; present-day Prince Edward Island) and Cape Breton
    Island (French �le Royale) annexed to Nova Scotia. Labrador coast, Anticosti Island, and the Madeleine Islands
    annexed to Newfoundland.
  4. 1769: Saint John’s Island colony (�le Saint-Jean) split from Nova Scotia. Its capital was Charlottetown.
  5. 1774: By the Quebec Act, Quebec province was extended to the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, and incorporated the
    Labrador coast, Anticosti Island, and the Madeleine Islands.
  6. 1783-09-03: Treaty of Paris recognized independence of the United States. The part of Quebec south of the Great
    Lakes became an acknowledged part of the United States.
  7. 1784-06-18: New Brunswick province and Cape Breton Island colony split from Nova Scotia by an Order in Council.
    Sydney was the capital of Cape Breton Island.
  8. 1788: Fredericton became capital of New Brunswick.
  9. 1791-08-24: Quebec province split into Upper Canada (corresponding to Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec).
  10. 1792-07-26: Capital of Upper Canada established at Niagara, which was simultaneously renamed Newark. The name
    change was reversed in 1794. The town is now Niagara-on-the-Lake.
  11. 1796-02-01: Capital of Upper Canada moved from Niagara to York.
  12. 1799: Name of Saint John’s Island changed to Prince Edward Island.
  13. 1809: Labrador coast and Anticosti Island transferred to Newfoundland.
  14. 1818: Treaty of 1818 fixed the boundary between the United States and Canada at 49� North
    latitude, westward from Lake of the Woods to the Oregon Territory, which became a condominium of
    the United States and Great Britain.
  15. 1820: Cape Breton Island merged with Nova Scotia.
  16. 1825: Anticosti Island, and the Labrador coast from Rivi�re Saint-Jean to Anse Sablon,
    transferred from Newfoundland to Lower Canada.
  17. 1834: Name of capital of Upper Canada changed from York to Toronto.
  18. 1841-02-10: Under Act of Union, name of Lower Canada changed to Canada East, and Upper Canada to
    Canada West. The two were united to form the province of Canada. Its capital was Kingston, now
    in Ontario.
  19. 1842-11-10: Webster-Ashburton Treaty settled the boundary between U.S. and Canada (Maine/New
    Brunswick, Minnesota/Hudson’s Bay Company).
  20. 1844: Capital of Canada province moved from Kingston to Montr�al (source [1]).
  21. 1846: Oregon Boundary Treaty established the 49� line as the boundary between the Oregon
    territory and British possessions. The British part was named New Caledonia.
  22. 1849: Vancouver Island organized as a colony.
  23. 1849: Capital of Canada province moved from Montr�al to Toronto.
  24. 1851: Capital of Canada province moved from Toronto to Quebec City.
  25. 1855: Capital of Canada province moved from Quebec City to Toronto.
  26. 1855: Status of Newfoundland changed to dominion, with Labrador as its dependency.
  27. 1858: New Caledonia was renamed British Columbia and organized as a colony.
  28. 1859: Capital of Canada province moved from Toronto to Quebec City.
  29. 1859: The remaining unorganized territory between British Columbia and the Arctic Ocean, and
    between Alaska and Rupert’s Land, was claimed by Great Britain and named The North-Western
    Territory.
  30. 1862: Stickeen territory was split from North-Western territory, extending northward from
    British Columbia to 62� North latitude.
  31. 1863: Stickeen territory split between British Columbia and North-Western territory, with the
    line of division following 60� North latitude.
  32. 1865: Capital of Canada province moved from Quebec City to Ottawa.
  33. 1866-11: Vancouver Island merged with British Columbia, which had now reached its present-day
    borders.
  34. 1867-07-01: By the British North America Act, Canada became a dominion. It had four provinces:
    New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec (these last two formed by splitting the former
    province of Canada). Its capital was Ottawa.
  35. 1870-07-15: Rupert’s Land ceded by the Hudson’s Bay Company and merged with North-Western
    territory to form The North-West Territories. Canada assumed the governance of North-West
    territories. Manitoba province created, consisting of about the southern third of present-day
    Manitoba.
  36. 1871-07-20: British Columbia became a province of Canada.
  37. 1873-07-01: Prince Edward Island became a province of Canada.
  38. 1880-09-01: Great Britain transferred its claims to all North American arctic islands to Canada.
  39. 1881-07-01: Manitoba annexed part of Northwest Territories.
  40. 1898-06-13: Yukon territory split from Northwest Territories.
  41. 1905-09-01: Alberta and Saskatchewan provinces formed from parts of Northwest Territories.
  42. 1912-05-15: Parts of Northwest Territories annexed to Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec provinces.
  43. 1927-03-01: Labrador hinterland transferred from Quebec province to the dominion of Newfoundland.
  44. 1934-02-16: Status of Newfoundland changed from dominion to crown colony.
  45. 1949-03-31: Newfoundland merged with Canada, becoming a province. Labrador, formerly its
    dependency, became part of the new province.
  46. 1967-01-18: Yellowknife became capital of Northwest Territories. Formerly, the region had been
    administered from Ottawa.
  47. ~1993: The Canada Post designator for Quebec was PQ, for “Province du Qu�bec”, until
    it was changed to the current QC. The exact date of the change calls for further research.
  48. 1999-04-01: Nunavut territory split from Northwest Territories (former FIPS code CA06).
    Canada Post continued to use NT as the designator for both Nunavut and Northwest
    Territories until 2000-12-12. See source [9] for a sidelight.
  49. 2001-12-06: Name of Newfoundland changed to Newfoundland and Labrador. (Date of proclamation; the
    Canadian Senate removed the last legal barrier by passing a constitutional amendment on 2001-11-20.)
  50. 2002-10-21: Canada Post changed postal designator of Newfoundland and Labrador from
    NF to NL (source [8]). A six-month grace period was allowed for the changeover.
  51. 2003-04-01: Name of Yukon Territory changed to Yukon (see source [7]).

Other names of subdivisions: 

  1. Alberta: Альберта (Russian)
  2. British Columbia: Britisch Kolumbien (German); Colombie britannique (French); Columbia Brit�nica
    (Spanish); Col�mbia Brit�nica (Portuguese); Columbia Britannica (Italian); New Caledonia (obsolete);
    Британская
    Колумбия (Russian)
  3. Manitoba: Манитоба (Russian)
  4. New Brunswick: Neubraunschweig (German); Nueva Brunswick (Spanish); Nouveau-Brunswick (French);
    Nova Brunswick (Portuguese)
  5. Newfoundland and Labrador: Neufundland [n] (German); Newfoundland (obsolete); Terra Nova (Portuguese);
    Terranova (Italian, Spanish); Terre-Neuve (French-obsolete); Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador (French);
    Ньюфаундленд (Russian)
  6. Northwest Territories: Nordwestgebiete, Nordwest-Territorien (German); Territoires du Nord-Ouest
    (French); Territori di Nordovest (Italian); Territorios del Noroeste (Spanish); Territ�rios do
    Noroeste (Portuguese)
  7. Nova Scotia: Acadia (obsolete, also refers to New Brunswick); Neuschottland [n] (German);
    Nouvelle-�cosse (French); Nova Esc�cia (Portuguese); Nueva Escocia (Spanish)
  8. Ontario: Ont�rio (Portuguese); Upper Canada (obsolete); Онтарио
    (Russian)
  9. Prince Edward Island: �le de Saint-Jean (obsolete); �le du Prince-�douard (French); Ilha do
    Pr�ncipe Eduardo (Portuguese); Isla Pr�ncipe Eduardo (Spanish); Isola Principe Edoardo (Italian);
    Prinz Edward-Insel (German)
  10. Quebec: Lower Canada (obsolete); Qu�bec (French, Italian, Portuguese); Quebeque (Portuguese-variant);
    Квебек (Russian)
  11. Saskatchewan: Саскачеван (Russian)
  12. Yukon: Territoire du Yukon (French-obsolete); Yukon Territory (obsolete); Yuk�n (Spanish)

Population history:

 2011-05-102006-05-162001-05-151996-05-141991-06-041986-06-031981-06-031976-06-011971-06-011966-06-011961-06-011956-06-01
Alberta3,645,2573,290,3502,974,8072,696,8262,545,5532,375,2782,237,7241,838,0371,627,8741,463,2031,331,9441,123,116
British Columbia4,400,0574,113,4873,907,7383,724,5003,282,0612,889,2072,744,4672,466,6082,184,6211,873,6741,629,0821,398,464
Manitoba1,208,2681,148,4011,119,5831,113,8981,091,9421,071,2321,026,2411,021,506988,247963,066921,686850,040
New Brunswick751,171729,997729,498738,133723,900710,442696,403677,250634,557616,788597,936554,616
Newfoundland and Labrador514,536505,469512,930551,792568,474568,349567,681557,725522,104493,396457,853415,074
Northwest Territories41,46241,46437,36039,67257,64952,23845,47142,60934,80728,73822,99819,313
Nova Scotia921,727913,462908,007909,282899,942873,199847,442828,571788,960756,039737,007694,717
Nunavut31,90629,47426,74524,730—-—-—-—-—-—-—-—-
Ontario12,851,82112,160,28211,410,04610,753,57310,084,8859,113,5158,625,1078,264,4657,703,1066,960,8706,236,0925,404,933
Prince Edward Island140,204135,851135,294134,557129,765126,646122,506118,229111,641108,535104,62999,285
Quebec7,903,0017,546,1317,237,4797,138,7956,895,9636,540,2766,438,4036,234,4456,027,7645,780,8455,259,2114,628,378
Saskatchewan1,033,381968,157978,933990,237988,9281,010,198968,313921,323926,242955,344925,181880,665
Yukon33,89730,37228,67430,76627,79723,50423,15321,83618,38814,38214,62812,190
Totals33,476,68831,612,89730,007,09428,846,76127,296,85925,354,08424,342,91122,992,60421,568,31120,014,88018,238,24716,080,791

 

 1956-06-011951-06-011941-06-021931-06-011921-06-011911-06-011901-04-011891-04-051881-04-041871-04-0218611851
Alberta1,123,116939,501796,169731,605588,454374,29573,022—-—-—-—-—-
British Columbia1,398,4641,165,210817,861694,263524,582392,480178,65798,17349,45936,24751,52455,000
Manitoba850,040776,541729,744700,139610,118461,394255,211152,50662,26025,228—-—-
New Brunswick554,616515,697457,401408,219387,876351,889331,120321,263321,233285,594252,047193,800
Newfoundland415,074361,416—-—-—-—-—-—-—-—-—-—-
Northwest Territories19,31316,00412,0289,3168,1436,50720,12998,96756,44648,0006,6915,700
Nova Scotia694,717642,584577,962512,846523,837492,338459,574450,396440,572387,800330,857276,854
Ontario5,404,9334,597,5423,787,6553,431,6832,933,6622,527,2922,182,9472,114,3211,926,9221,620,8511,396,091952,004
Prince Edward Island99,28598,42995,04788,03888,61593,728103,259109,078108,89194,02180,85762,678
Quebec4,628,3784,055,6813,331,8822,874,6622,360,5102,005,7761,648,8981,488,5351,359,0271,191,5161,111,566890,261
Saskatchewan880,665831,728895,992921,785757,510492,43291,279—-—-—-—-—-
Yukon12,1909,0964,9144,2304,1578,51227,219—-—-—-—-—-
Totals16,080,79114,009,42911,506,65510,376,7868,787,9497,206,6435,371,3154,833,2394,324,8103,689,2573,229,6332,436,297

 

Notes:

  1. The 1996 census reported a population of 64,404 for Northwest Territories, which included Nunavut at that time.
    The figures shown above for those territories in 1996 were calculated retroactively.
  2. Prior to 1949, Newfoundland had a separate census. Its population was 289,588 in 1935, and 321,819 in 1945.
  3. Populations of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Yukon included in Northwest Territories before 1900.
  4. Population of Manitoba included in Northwest Territories before 1870.
  5. 1951 figures are duplicated to facilitate comparison of successive censuses.

Sources: 

  1. [1] “A Capital for Canada: conflict and compromise in the nineteenth century”, David B. Knight. Chicago: University
    of Chicago, Dept. of Geography, 1977. It describes six times that the capital of Canada was moved in 1841-1867.
  2. [2] Land and freshwater area, by province and
    territory   on the Statistics Canada website. Figures given in the table above are
    total area (land plus freshwater; retrieved 2004-12-30).
  3. [3] http://npc.nunavut.ca/eng/nunavut/boundary.html (retrieved 2005-11-12) was a description of the boundary of
    the Nunavut Settlement Area. Schedule
    I   of the Nunavut Act describes the boundary between Nunavut and N.W.T.
  4. [4] The Canada Year Book 1945. Edmond Cloutier, Ottawa, 1945.
  5. [5] The Canadian Pocket Encyclopedia, 33rd Edition. Quick Canadian Facts, Ltd., Toronto, 1978.
  6. [6] A Historical Atlas of Canada, by D.G.G. Kerr. Thomas Nelson & Sons (Canada), Toronto, 1963.
  7. [7] Abbreviations and symbols for the names of the
    provinces and territories   on the Natural Resources Canada website;
    Yukon Territory name change to
    Yukon   on the Canadian Library and Archives website (both retrieved 2009-07-17).
  8. [8] http://www.canadapost.ca/business/corporate/about/newsroom/pr/default-e.asp?prid=644 (retrieved 2002-12-13).
  9. [9] Nunatsiaq
    News   had an amusing article about the choice of postal abbreviation for Nunavut
    (retrieved 2002-12-13).
  10. [10] Table of Geographic and Administrative Information
    …  , on the Natural Resources Canada website, summarizes the secondary divisions of
    each province and territory (retrieved 2009-07-17).

Back to main statoids page Last updated: 2015-06-30
Copyright © 1999-2005, 2007-2015 by Gwillim Law.
The Canadian Encyclopedia

Recherche dans lEncyclopédie canadienne

    Connexion

    ×

    Pourquoi menregistrer ?

    Linscription améliore votre expérience TCE avec la possibilité denregistrer des éléments dans votre liste de lecture personnelle et daccéder à la carte interactive.

    Créer mon compte


    Places
    Parcs et réserves
    Parcs nationaux
    Réserves
    Réserves de la biosphère des Nations Unies
    Parcs municipaux
    Parcs provinciaux
    Canaux et voies navigables
    Villes et régions habitées
    Districts et municipalités
    Villages
    Réserves et régions autochtones
    Villes
    Municipalités
    Quartiers
    Transport
    Aéroport
    Autoroutes
    Chemins de fer
    Voies navigables et ports
    Cols et pistes
    Ponts
    Terrain
    Îles
    Régions
    Prairie
    Frontières et noms géographiques
    Fleuves
    Chutes
    Caractéristiques physiques
    Vallée
    Cols et pistes
    Caps et péninsule
    Péninsule
    Montagnes
    Océans
    Eaux intérieurs
    Régions littorales
    Lacs et réservoirs
    Topographie
    Bâtiments et monuments
    Monuments
    Bâtiments
    Hôpitaux
    Provinces
    Cénotaphes
    Territoire
    Mémorials
    Stades
    Hauts lieux de l’architecture
    Art et culture
    Salles et théâtres
    Architecture
    Musées, galeries et archives
    Écoles et institutions
    Provinces et territoires
    Saskatchewan
    Nouveau-Brunswick
    Alberta
    Colombie-Britannique
    Nunavut
    Yukon
    Québec
    Nouvelle-Écosse
    Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador
    Ontario
    Territoires du Nord-Ouest
    Île-du-Prince-Édouard
    Manitoba
    Lieux historiques
    Sites archéologiques
    Territoires traditionnels
    Lieux historiques provinciale
    Lieux historiques nationale
    Exploration
    Sites du patrimoine mondial des Nations Unies
    Bâtiments historiques
    Militaire
    Monuments
    Mémorials
    Champs de batailles
    Bases des Forces canadiennes
    Personnes
    Histoire/Personnages historiques
    Canada atlantique
    Nouvelle-France
    Femmes
    Confédération
    Haut-Canada
    Bas-Canada
    Militaire
    Explorateurs
    Ouest et Nord-Ouest du Canada
    Traite de fourrures
    Peuples autochtones
    Communautés et sociologie
    LGBTQ2S
    Immigrants et refugiés
    Femmes
    Éducation
    Canadiens asiatiques
    Francophones
    Personnages historiques
    Communautés confessionnelles
    Canadiens arabes et du Moyen-Orient
    Dirigeants et activistes
    Canadiens américains
    Canadiens latino-américains
    Canadiens européens
    Canadiens noirs et africains
    Peuples autochtones
    Géographie et nature
    Zoologistes
    Explorateurs
    Biologistes
    Géographes et cartographes
    Écologistes
    Spécialistes des sciences de la Terre
    Physiciens
    Chimistes
    Sports et loisirs
    Entraîneurs et gérants
    Minorités
    Athlètes
    Femmes
    Compétiteurs
    Art et culture
    Théâtres
    Femmes
    Groupes de musique
    Éducateurs en musique
    Chanteurs et auteur-compositeurs
    Minorités dans les arts/Communautés diverses
    Industrie musicales
    Cuisine et gastronomie
    Histoire
    Interprètes
    Écrivains
    Télévision et film
    Artistes
    Architectes, constructrices et planificatrices
    Musiciens
    Interprètes de musique classique
    Compositeurs et chefs-d’orchestres
    Éducateurs
    Radio
    Science et technologie
    Explorateurs
    Minorités dans les STIM
    Informaticiens
    Ingénieurs
    Spécialistes des sciences de la Terre
    Architectes, constructrices et planificatrices
    Géographes et cartographes
    Mathématiciens
    Spécialistes des sciences sociales
    Personnages historiques
    Professionnels de la santé
    Inventeurs et innovateurs
    Les femmes en STIM
    Paléontologues et archéologues
    Aviateurs
    Chimistes
    Astronautes
    Biologistes
    Physiciens
    Spécialistes des sciences de la santé
    Réformateurs & activistes
    Droit et politique
    Femmes
    Peuples autochtones
    Lieutenant-gouverneurs
    Personnes condamnées à tort
    Fonctionnaires
    Juges
    Rebelles et dirigeants de la résistance
    Réformateurs & activistes
    Spécialistes des sciences politiques
    Avocats
    Royauté
    Politiciens
    Criminels et hors-la-loi
    Application de la loi
    Gouverneurs généraux
    Premiers ministres provinciaux et territoriaux
    Chef syndicaliste
    Espions
    Sénateurs
    Commissaires
    Diplomates et ambassadeurs
    Premiers ministres fédéraux
    Militaire
    Maitien de la paix et les Nations Unies
    Personnel médical
    Deuxième Guerre mondiale
    Peuples autochtones
    Rébellion du Nord-Ouest
    Guerre en Afghanistan
    Armées
    Guerre de Corée
    Forces coloniales britanniques
    Récipiendaires de la Croix de Victoria
    Force navale
    Canadiens Noirs
    Première Guerre mondiale
    Femmes
    Colonial
    La guerre d’Afrique du Sud
    Force aérienne
    Affaires et économie
    Entrepreneurs
    Économistes
    Philanthrope
    Hommes d’affaires
    Femmes d’affaires
    Industrie
    Éducation
    LGBTQ2S
    Femmes
    Archivistes
    Peuples autochtones
    Historiens
    Conservateurs
    Professeurs et éducateurs
    Choses
    Communautés et sociologie
    Catastrophes
    Immigration
    Tendances sociales
    Démographie
    Crime
    Enjeux sociaux
    Sociologie
    Diverses communautés
    Mouvements et organisations
    Manifestations
    Religion
    Jours fériés et commémorations
    Commissions royales
    Préjugé
    Langues
    Syndicats
    Affaires municipales
    Lois et programmes sociaux
    Événements sociaux
    Géographie et nature
    Caractéristiques physiques
    Ressources naturelles
    Climat
    Plantes
    Animaux
    Agriculture
    Affaires municipales
    Hydrologie
    Catastrophes et événements météorologiques extrêmes
    Environnement
    Géologie
    Exploitation minières et métallurgie
    Transport
    Sports et loisirs
    Stades
    Événements et compétitions sportives
    Histoire
    Prix et trophées
    Musées et temples de la renommée
    Organisations
    Sports
    Équipes
    Art et culture
    Divertissement
    Communications
    Architecture
    Musique
    Littérature
    Danse
    Religion et philosophie
    Prix
    Festivals
    Mouvements et organisations
    Nourriture
    Performances
    Arts visuels
    Culture
    Éducation
    Sources primaires
    Formation en musique
    Institutions d’enseignment
    Ressources interactives
    Bibliothèques et bilbiothéconomie
    Types d’éducation
    Enseignment et apprentissage
    Histoire
    Folklore
    Bas-Canada
    Haut-Canada
    Économie
    Constitution
    Politique
    Provinciale
    Humanités
    Nouvelle-France
    Ouest et Nord-Ouest du Canada
    Traités
    Histoire sociale
    Exploration
    Regionale
    Médailles, Emblèmes et Héraldique
    Territoriale
    Lieux historiques
    Affaires
    Premiers
    Catastrophes
    Commémorations
    Thèses historiques
    Rébellions & émeutes
    Colonies
    Canada atlantique
    Nationale
    Militaire
    Industrie
    Science et technologie
    Mathématiques
    Poids et mesures
    Institutions et organisations
    Énergie
    Hydrologie
    Transport
    Exploitation minières et métallurgie
    Technologie
    Outils
    Industrie
    Pseudo-science
    Chimie
    Climat and climatologie
    Ingénirie
    Communications
    Santé et médecine
    Physique
    Sciences de la Terre
    Démographie
    L’informatique
    Inventions et innovations
    Biologie
    Militaire
    Engagements militaires
    Colonial
    Forts
    Traités
    Défense
    Technologie
    Guerres
    Forces armées
    Commémorations
    Histoire
    Maintien de la paix
    Organisations et régiments
    Droit et politique
    Traités
    Gouvernement
    Organisations internationales
    Lois et textes législatifs
    Système judiciaire
    Affaires ineternationales
    Institutions et bureaux provinciaux
    Évévenements politiques
    Droits et politiques
    Branches du droit
    Politique public
    Statuts politiques
    Institutions et bureaux municipaux
    Représentants et organismes
    Chartres
    Tribunaux
    Immigration
    Grèves et manifestations
    Droits
    Législation
    Dossiers
    Commissions et rapport
    Application de la loi
    Institutions et bureaux fédéraux
    Institutions parlementaires
    Police et securité
    Affaires et économie
    Financier
    Lois & programmes
    Entreprises
    Imposition
    Service public
    Industrie
    Politique
    Commerce
    Syndicats et travailleurs
    Économie
    Monnaie


    Naviguer “Provinces et territoires”

    Alberta
    Alberta

    Article

    Alberta

    L’Alberta, la plus occidentale des trois provinces des Prairies canadiennes, partage de nombreuses caractéristiques physiques avec ses voisines de l’Est, la Saskatchewan et le Manitoba.

    Alberta
    Alberta

    Chronologie

    Alberta

    L’Alberta, la plus occidentale des trois provinces des Prairies canadiennes, partage de nombreuses caractéristiques physiques avec ses voisines de l’Est, la Saskatchewan et le Manitoba. Les montagnes Rocheuses forment la partie méridionale de la frontière qui, à l’Ouest, sépare l’Alberta de la Colombie-Britannique.

    Atlantique, provinces de l
    Atlantique, provinces de l

    Article

    Atlantique, provinces de l

    Les provinces de l’Atlantique sont la Nouvelle-Écosse, l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, le Nouveau-Brunswick et Tere-Neuve. Les provinces maritimes (N.-É., Î.-P.-É. et N.-B.) ont beaucoup de points en commun.

    Colombie-Britannique
    Colombie-Britannique

    Chronologie

    Colombie-Britannique

    Province la plus à l’ouest du Canada, la Colombie-Britannique est un territoire montagneux dont la population se concentre surtout dans la région du sud‑ouest. La Colombie‑Britannique est la troisième plus grande province du pays, après le Québec et l’Ontario : elle occupe 10 % de la superficie du Canada.

    Colombie-Britannique
    Colombie-Britannique

    Article

    Colombie-Britannique

    Province la plus à l’ouest du Canada, la Colombie-Britannique est un territoire montagneux dont la population se concentre surtout dans la région du sud‑ouest. La Colombie‑Britannique est la troisième plus grande province du pays, après le Québec et l’Ontario : elle occupe 10 % de la superficie du Canada.

    Lexploration de lArctique
    Lexploration de lArctique

    Chronologie

    Lexploration de lArctique

    L’exploration de l’Arctique débute sous le règne d’Élisabeth Ire. Les marins anglais recherchent alors un raccourci vers les îles des Épices de l’Extrême-Orient en passant par les mers nordiques de l’Amérique : c’est la recherche du passage du Nord-Ouest.

    Labrador
    Labrador

    Article

    Labrador

    Les Monts Torngat, les sommets les plus élevés à l’est des Rocheuses, se dressent au nord, dans une isolation splendide. Bien que le Labrador soit situé à la même latitude que les îles Britanniques, il est très peu habité en raison de ses terres inhospitalières et de son climat extrême.

    Les Acadiens
    Les Acadiens

    Chronologie

    Les Acadiens

    Cette ligne du temps retrace les personnalités et événements marquants de l’histoire acadienne.

    Les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et la Confédération
    Les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et la Confédération

    Article

    Les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et la Confédération

    ​Les Territoires du Nord-Ouest (TNO) sont entrés dans la Confédération après que la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson ait cédé la Terre de Rupert et le Territoire du Nord-Ouest au Canada en 1870.

    Manitoba
    Manitoba

    Chronologie

    Manitoba

    La province du Manitoba, située au cœur du Canada, est souvent surnommée la province « clé de voûte » en raison de sa situation géographique. Elle est délimitée au nord par le Nunavut et la baie d’Hudson, à l’est par l’Ontario, au sud par les États-Unis et à l’ouest par la Saskatchewan.

    Manitoba
    Manitoba

    Article

    Manitoba

    Le Manitoba est une province canadienne située au centre du pays, délimitée à l’ouest par la Saskatchewan, par la baie d’Hudson et l’Ontario à l’est, par le Nunavut au nord et par le Dakota du Nord et le Minnesota au sud. La province est fondée sur une partie des territoires traditionnels des Assiniboines, des Dakotas, des Cris, des Dénés, des Anishinaabes et des Oji-Cris, ainsi que des terres de la nation Métis. La propriété terrienne est toujours régie par les traités numéros 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, et 10. Selon le recensement de 2016, le Manitoba compte 1 278 365 habitants, ce qui en fait le cinquième territoire ou province le plus populeux du Canada. Le Manitoba se joint à la Confédération en 1870, et sa capitale, Winnipeg, est incorporée peu après, en 1873. Le premier ministre actuel en est Brian Pallister, à la tête d’un gouvernement progressiste conservateur majoritaire.

    Nouveau-Brunswick
    Nouveau-Brunswick

    Chronologie

    Nouveau-Brunswick

    Le Nouveau-Brunswick est l’une des trois provinces qui ensemble sont appelées les « Maritimes ». Relié à la Nouvelle-Écosse par l’étroit isthme de Chignectou et séparé de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard par le détroit de Northumberland, le Nouveau-Brunswick constitue un pont terrestre entre cette région et l’Amérique du Nord continentale.

    Nouveau-Brunswick
    Nouveau-Brunswick

    Article

    Nouveau-Brunswick

    Le Nouveau-Brunswick est l’une des trois provinces qui ensemble sont appelées les « Maritimes ». Relié à la Nouvelle-Écosse par l’étroit isthme de Chignectou et séparé de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard par le détroit de Northumberland, le Nouveau-Brunswick constitue un pont terrestre entre cette région et l’Amérique du Nord continentale. La province est délimitée au nord par le Québec et à l’ouest par les États-Unis (Maine). En 1784, les Britanniques ont divisé la Nouvelle-Écosse à l’isthme de Chignectou et nommé la partie ouest et nord « Nouveau-Brunswick », d’après le duché allemand de Brunswick-Lüneburg. Le Nouveau-Brunswick est maintenant la seule province officiellement bilingue du Canada.

    Nouvelle-Écosse
    Nouvelle-Écosse

    Chronologie

    Nouvelle-Écosse

    La Nouvelle-Écosse, deuxième plus petite province du Canada (après l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard), se trouve sur la côte sud-est du pays. La province comprend le Cap-Breton, une grande île située au nord-est de la partie continentale.

    Nouvelle-Écosse
    Nouvelle-Écosse

    Article

    Nouvelle-Écosse

    La Nouvelle-Écosse, deuxième plus petite province du Canada (après l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard), se trouve sur la côte sud-est du pays. La province comprend le Cap-Breton, une grande île située au nord-est de la partie continentale.

    Nunavut
    Nunavut

    Chronologie

    Nunavut

    Le Nunavut, un mot du dialecte inuktitut des Inuits de l’Est de l’Arctique signifiant « Notre terre », est une territore canadienne.

    Nunavut
    Nunavut

    Article

    Nunavut

    Le Nunavut – « notre terre » en inuktitut – couvre plus de 2 millions de km2 et compte une population de 35 944 habitants (recensement de 2016), dont approximativement 85 % sont inuits. Le territoire comprend, en gros, la partie du Canada continental et de l’archipel Arctique située au nord et au nord-est de la limite forestière. Le Nunavut est le territoire le plus grand et le plus septentrional du Canada et la cinquième plus grande division administrative du monde. Les habitants du Nunavut, les Nunavummiut, vivent dans 25 communautés éparpillées sur ce vaste territoire, la majeure partie dans la capitale, Iqaluit, qui compte 7 740 habitants (au recensement de 2016). La création du Nunavut en 1999 (la région faisait auparavant partie des Territoires du Nord-Ouest) constitue le premier changement important de la carte politique du Canada depuis l’entrée de Terre-Neuve dans la Confédération en 1949. En plus de modifier les frontières politiques internes du Canada, la création du Nunavut constitue à l’époque un important événement politique. Grâce à son activisme politique et de longues négociations, un petit groupe autochtone marginalisé est parvenu à surmonter de nombreux obstacles pour mettre en place pacifiquement un gouvernement qu’il contrôle à l’intérieur de l’État canadien, devenant ainsi maître de son territoire, de ses ressources et de son avenir. De ce point de vue, la création du Nunavut est un moment historique de l’évolution du Canada et elle marque également un développement important dans l’histoire des Autochtones au niveau mondial.

    Ontario
    Ontario

    Chronologie

    Ontario

    L’Ontario est la province la plus peuplée et la seconde en superficie du Canada. Elle s’étend de l’Île Middle dans le lac Érié, à l’extrême sud du Canada, jusqu’à la frontière du Manitoba à la baie d’Hudson au nord et des rives du fleuve Saint-Laurent à l’est, jusqu’à la frontière du Manitoba, à l’ouest.

    Ontario
    Ontario

    Article

    Ontario

    L’Ontario est une province canadienne délimitée à l’ouest par le Manitoba, au nord par la baie d’Hudson, à l’est par le Québec, et au sud par New York, les Grands Lacs, le Michigan et le Minnesota. La province a été fondée sur certaines parties des territoires traditionnels des Ojibwés, des Odawas, des Potawatomi, des Algonquins, des Mississauga, des Haudenosaunee, des Neutres, des Hurons-Wendats, des Cris, des Oji-Cris et des Métis. Le territoire est aujourd’hui régi par 46 traités, dont les traités Williams et Robinson, le traité du Haut-Canada, ainsi que les traités no 3, 5 et 9. Selon le recensement de 2016, l’Ontario compte 13 448 494 habitants, ce qui en fait la province la plus peuplée du Canada. L’Ontario est une des quatre provinces fondatrices de la Confédération de 1867, avec le Nouveau-Brunswick, la Nouvelle-Écosse et le Québec. Sa capitale est Toronto. Son gouvernement actuel, mené par le premier ministre Doug Ford, est majoritaire progressiste-conservateur.

    Patrimoine acadien
    Patrimoine acadien

    collection

    Patrimoine acadien

    Cette collection propose d’explorer le riche patrimoine des Acadiens par le biais d’articles, d’expositions, de quiz portant sur les arts et la culture, l’histoire et la société, les personnages historiques ainsi que les lieux associés au peuple acadien.

    • «
    • 1
    • 2
    • »

    About the Author: admin